Adobe Dynamic Tag ManagementResource Guide

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Adobe DTM FAQs

  1. How does Adobe DTM’s engine work?
  2. How does Adobe DTM address page load times?
  3. What information is available to Adobe DTM to use?
  4. Can Adobe DTM “kill tags” that are taking too long to load?
  5. Can Adobe DTM load multiple pixels and make multiple simultaneous requests?
  6. Why has Adobe DTM chosen “Client Side” over “Server Side Process”?
  7. Does DoubleClick / Omniture integration work within Adobe DTM and what version of Genesis are they using?
  8. What will show up as DoubleClick top referring URLs with Adobe DTM? Assuming it'll be the iFrame tag, are we then able to map that back to the actual page?
  9. Are we able to generate values within a DoubleClick floodlight so that we can fire a different tag based on values on the page?
  10. Does Adobe DTM have media attribution capability?
  11. How does Adobe DTM address the number of domains outside of the company that have to be called to load the different pages?
  12. Does Adobe DTM provide performance monitoring?
  13. What is Adobe DTM’s Data storage policy?
  14. Does Adobe DTM use and/or store visitor IP data?
  15. What about security when the Adobe DTM library is hosted on our own servers, especially with regards to FTP access?
  16. Can you provide details on what data is transferred between the Client, the Server and Adobe DTM?
  17. Are all basic tags and affiliate tags supported?
  18. Does Adobe DTM handle attribution?
  19. Does Adobe DTM support Multi-Media tags like video playback analysis?
  20. Does Adobe DTM help me manage User Privacy and do not Track support?
  21. Does Adobe DTM provide alerts and how quickly are the alerts sent out?
  22. Can Adobe DTM be loaded Synchronous?
  23. Can Adobe DTM be loaded Fully asynchronous?
  24. How big is the Adobe DTM file and when does it load?
  25. What is the timeline to install Adobe DTM?
  26. Does Adobe DTM provide 24/7 Support?
  27. Can I get dedicated account service support?
  28. Does Adobe DTM work with mobile devices and tablets?
  29. Can Adobe DTM help me clean up and sort my data?
  30. Can you describe their release management process?
  31. Does Adobe DTM support Universal Deployment?
  32. Does Adobe DTM support HTML5?
  33. From where can Adobe DTM gather data?
  34. What are the benefits of self-hosting Adobe DTM?
  35. What are the benefits to loading tags in parallel?
  36. How does Adobe DTM handle Multi-tier development practices?
  37. What does Adobe DTM’s workflow look like?
  38. Are there different user access levels for Adobe DTM?
  39. How do I install Adobe DTM?
  40. Where can I place tags in my page?
  41. Can Adobe DTM be used to deploy unique action tags like Atlas, DFA, javascript and iFrame tagging?
  42. What events can Adobe DTM track?
  43. Can Adobe DTM help me segment cookies to different partners to test things like remarketing partners?
  44. Can I see who made changes to my rules and tags?
  45. What happens if two people are working on the same rule at the same time?
  46. Can I test new rules (unapproved rules) on the live site?
  47. What’s the difference between the Asynchronous and Synchronous installation of Adobe DTM?
  48. Where should I load the SiteCatalyst Page code?
  49. How does Adobe DTM install SiteCatalyst event tracking?
  50. How does Adobe DTM with AJAX?
  51. Flash-tracking sounds equally laborious with Adobe DTM as without?
  52. What policies are in place to ensure privacy concerns with Adobe DTM?
  53. Can Adobe DTM hide my activity?
  54. How does Adobe DTM handle FTP error handling?
  55. What is ROVER
  56. What is the file size of Adobe DTM
  57. Do you have Client Caching Capabilities?
  58. What happens if a client is using a CDN like Akamai?

How does Adobe DTM’s engine work?

Adobe DTM has engines for each of the tools DTM natively supports. The library stores only metadata, not script blocks, making it very small and efficient. When rules are triggered, that metadata is translated into the tool's native syntax and executed as if that script were directly in the page.

Consider the TMS to exist in two parts:

A) Creation of the TMS rules: You use the admin interface to describe the interactions you care to track or react to in some way, and how to track or react. This experience will create your "library" and place it on the server of your choosing.

B) The user uses the site: A user comes to the site and downloads the file created in A (hosted on your server). This file contains all of the rules that user interactions may trigger. As a user navigates and interacts, they may trigger rules that you created in A, resulting in script being executed or additional tags being loaded into the page. Some of these scripts or tags may be contained within other files, also loaded from your server. Then, these scripts may contact other servers to track information (Google, doubleclick, etc.). At no point during the user's experience will a server owned by Adobe DTM be contacted.

How does Adobe DTM address page load times?

This is a very common struggle and can often be highly related to the fact that these tags all run sequentially vs. running in parallel to one-another. Therefore, each tag's latency, download, and execution is additive to the page. Adobe DTM addresses this in a number of ways by allowing you to control when tags are loading, even delaying tag load until the page load is complete (improving user experience and Google's recorded page load time which is based on a mix of DOM ready and onload), and you can also load tags in parallel via dynamically-rendered iFrames. Without offloading these server calls to a server-side process (which comes with its fair share of potential issues and, in most cases, significant expense), Adobe DTM provides you the absolutely fastest methods available for loading tags in a client browser. Loading 3rd party tags in parallel in iFrames alone, as an example, has improved page load times by over 5 seconds for some of the clients who had high tag counts. SiteCatalyst, though, must run in the scope of the current page to work properly, so that will always impact page load time in some way. That is a requirement and limitation of SiteCatalyst, not of any other system.

What information is available to Adobe DTM to use?

Adobe DTM can get any information that is available in the DOM of any page, or if the client/site is willing, they can populate custom variables in Adobe DTM with server-side data and reference those variables to fill pageviews, events, custom variables, or any other type of tag.

Can Adobe DTM “kill tags” that are taking too long to load?

Absolutely. You can configure the default timeout directly in the UI for your web property configuration, and you can set more granular timeouts for specific tags if needed. Please note, however, that tag "killing" has limited browser support. Many tools will offer this functionality, but for many users/browsers, this is not actually possible or will not work as expected due to browser limitations.

Can Adobe DTM load multiple pixels and make multiple simultaneous requests?

Adobe DTM has several methods of parallelizing tag loading. In general, the only thing that limits Adobe DTM's ability to parallelize tag loads are the physical number of channels available to the browser for simultaneous downloads.

Why has Adobe DTM chosen “Client Side” over “Server Side Process”?

Conceivably, it's possible to take a "single tag" approach whereby all data needed by several tags is passed to one tag by the browser/client. Then, a server-side process is responsible for taking that single request and distributing it to multiple services, away from the user, away from the site.

Think, for example, a tag on your page calling
http://www.TagCentralStation.com/pixel.gif?param1=value…

TagCentralStation then would contact adwords.google.com, fls.doubleclick.com, fetchback.com, comscore.com, quantcast.com, clearsaleing.com, etc. and "distribute" this call by calling for pixels in the native format for each of these services. This allows the browser to fire and see one tag, and a server-side process then calls other tags. But it's not that simple...

Before selling Satellite to Adobe, Search Discovery did extensive testing of these types of approaches while building Adobe DTM, and ultimately found that the potential benefit (a potential boost in speed) was not as good as theory may suggest, and it comes at incredible cost to create and maintain the server(s), CDNs, software, and connections needed to host a mission-critical data distribution system, since you are effectively sitting directly in the middle of a critical flow of data. Any issue with the single tag, while it could have dire effects to the page and user experience, also presents a significant data risk: taking it down if there ever are issues means disabling all tracking flowing through that central hub. Not to mention the implications of having yet another data store, where security, privacy policy, DDoS attacks, etc. are all issues that need to be considered.

And beyond that, none of these tags are actually architected to work this way today, so there are unintended consequences in terms of IP-based location, HTTP headers being passed that are responsible for data not contained within the image call, etc. Finally, you also have no way of using your current suite of testing solutions like Charles, LiveHTTPheaders, WebKit Console, Firebug, Fiddler, etc. Since all communication is server-side, you have no way of knowing when any one branch breaks until all of a sudden you stop getting data. Diagnosing an issue like that is, as you can imagine, extremely difficult.

This is probably more backstory than you wanted! However, we want to give you the whole story of why a server-side process comes with incredible risk compared to a client-side process, and that's why we consider it a very easy decision to make Adobe DTM fully client-side. It means it scales infinitely (Adobe doesn’t have to scale infrastructure/architecture for traffic volumes), uses the native syntax/design of your tags rather than spoofing their functionality, and ensures your accuracy and ability to audit remains unchanged from the approach you have today.

We fully expect that places like Google, DoubleClick, Atlas, ComScore, QuantCast, etc. will all open up better data-exchange APIs in the near future, allowing for simpler data transfer, so there will be newer and better methods of triggering "tags" as time goes on, but the outcome of the extensive testing and journey is that it is simply not the right approach to go server-side at current day.

Does DoubleClick / Omniture integration work within Adobe DTM and what version of Genesis are they using?

Absolutely. The majority of Genesis integration relies more on parameterization of destination URLs and direct integrations with reporting APIs/etc. (for display, email, etc.), not tagging (although there are tagging components). But since you can do anything in Adobe DTM that you can do directly in the page, Adobe DTM changes nothing about what you are able to do with any tool of any kind.

What will show up as DoubleClick top referring URLs with Adobe DTM? Assuming it'll be the iFrame tag, are we then able to map that back to the actual page?

You have the option of loading any tag either directly into the page or the iFrame. If the iFrame, you'll see the location of the iFrame's file name, but you can easily pass a URL into a param of the doubleclick tag as a secondary option. If referring URLs are important, however, you would want to load that tag directly into the page. And this also depends on whether the iFrame is 1st or 3rd party. This may warrant further discussion to better understand the use case and recommend the best solution.

Are we able to generate values within a DoubleClick floodlight so that we can fire a different tag based on values on the page?

Absolutely. Adobe DTM wouldn't be very useful if you couldn't! You can pass dynamic or static data into these tags very easily, and you can add conditions to control very precisely when these variants are put into use and which data they receive in URL parameters (or other fields, for example: Google's Adwords tag receives information via vars it translates into params, rather than direct data injection into a URL like floodlight/spotlight).

Does Adobe DTM have media attribution capability?

Yes. You can easily configure simple or complex attribution models to credit first, last, all-split, time decay, book-ended or other models and control the total scope of sessions (specific # of sessions, time, all for a visitor, etc.) included in the attribution model. Attribution is actually a very serious endeavor, so we work closely with clients who would like to use it. For affiliates, it's a very important mechanism of mitigating cost. But for media spend and marketing channels, TMS-based attribution can be a very dangerous technique, especially when working with self-optimizing platforms or intermittent marketing patterns/campaigns (short-life promos, email, etc.). Search Discovery can work closely with you to strategize the right approach. Search Discovery has some of the foremost experts on attribution analysis and modeling in the country.

How does Adobe DTM address the number of domains outside of the company that have to be called to load the different pages?

Without moving these beacon calls to a server-side process (which again has cost and many implications), there is no way to reduce the number of DNS lookups and connections made during the course of page load if that page needs to load 3rd party tags. Adobe DTM can, however, let the browser parallelize those connections and downloads, which does not currently happen on the site: these tags run sequentially in the page's physical markup. The latency and download involved with these connections is sequential today, an issue completely removed by Adobe DTM for 3rd-party tags.

Does Adobe DTM provide performance monitoring?

DTM itself does not but Search Discovery partners with Gomez and/or Keynote for performance testing, scenario testing, and application/site monitoring and bundle this into the enterprise service offering. For performance monitoring, we do not think it is enough to simply monitor the performance of tags or tag management. It is essential to measure the performance of the entire web site. With comprehensive performance monitoring, the customers get a holistic view of the entire site’s performance, rather than the limited view of tag performance. Also, oftentimes tags affect the rest of the site, or the rest of the site affects tags: these types of platforms are the only ones that are able to see this interaction between tags and the rest of the page, and are therefore the only viable option in true performance monitoring.

We do not provide any measurement specific to the TMS, as this is a myopic view with too many interdependencies to be considered a viable solution. Through Gomez/Keynote, you get the full picture of everything happening.

What is Adobe DTM’s Data storage policy?

Adobe DTM does not set any cookies or store user data of any kind, ever.

Does Adobe DTM use and/or store visitor IP data?

Nothing is ever stored for a user session, it's actually not possible in Adobe DTM. No IP or user data of any kind is stored. In fact, a user of a site will never make contact with the servers at all. The only thing that is stored in the database are the rules you create. And

What about security when the Adobe DTM library is hosted on our own servers, especially with regards to FTP access?

Same security and policies whether you host on Amazon S3 or your own servers. Amazon S3 is physically separate from the admin database and they do not talk to each other in any way other than to create your rules and create your library.

Can you provide details on what data is transferred between the Client, the Server and Adobe DTM?

No data of any kind is transferred between from a client (end user on a site) to Adobe DTM, ever.

Are all basic tags and affiliate tags supported?

Yes, all are fully supported in their native format with dynamic replacement of values like revenue, orderID, etc.

Does Adobe DTM handle attribution?

Adobe DTM can handle any type of attribution scenarios for marketing and/or affiliate channels. Adobe DTM allows for conversion attribution and affiliate deduplication through the use of extensions and customizations that allow Adobe DTM to set cookies (necessary for this functionality).

Does Adobe DTM support Multi-Media tags like video playback analysis?

Yes, Adobe DTM supports media tracking in a number of ways. They have native support for HTML5, YouTube API, and Vimeo API. For custom Flash video players, they have full support of Flash tracking with the Flash tracking module. Tracking media in Adobe DTM is extremely simple and all done in the great UI.

Does Adobe DTM help me manage User Privacy and do not Track support?

Adobe DTM provides a best-in-class privacy solution. They offer a total site do not track solution, rather than just a TMS-specific solution. Compliance is a topic that has implications on the server architecture (cookies set by the server), tags within the TMS, and technologies that may live outside of the TMS. The solutions cover 100% of the compliance issues in need of monitoring. A TMS-only solution would hardly scratch the surface of the issues and can significantly degrade the performance of the TMS and the site itself. Additionally, it’s worth mentioning that Adobe DTM is one of the few, if not the only, tag management systems that does not set cookies or record data of any kind. This means that Adobe DTM doesn’t have to police itself, as it is already 100% compliant.

Does Adobe DTM provide alerts and how quickly are the alerts sent out?

Yes, but the timing depends on the nature of the alert but can start as quickly as real time. For the enterprise clients we only offer full site performance monitoring through the partnerships with Gomez and Keynote. Through the integrated partnerships with the undisputed leaders in performance monitoring and taking a “full site” approach, we avoid the issues overlooked by a myopic TMS-only solution which barely scratch the surface.

Can Adobe DTM be loaded Synchronous?

Yes. Installation and UI options exist to manage sync and async.

Can Adobe DTM be loaded Fully asynchronous?

Yes, Adobe DTM itself can be installed asynchronously.

How big is the Adobe DTM file and when does it load?

The Adobe DTM script is lightweight and fast, and is cached for the session. User experience and page responsiveness is better with Adobe DTM than any other solution as they are smaller, more optimized, and self-hosted.

What is the timeline to install Adobe DTM?

Adobe DTM can begin tracking in-page interactions, installing tools site-wide or in specific sections/pages, segmenting rules, and more the minute it is installed (a single script that is identical on every page). Adobe DTM also comes with default rules which begin tracking valuable UX data the day you install it. However, the complete answer depends on the scope of tools, tags, interaction types. Due to the superiority of the UI and the workflows in Adobe DTM, rules are trivial to create, and no tag “templates” or custom development needs to happen. We’ve had clients tell us that in the time it takes to create and install a “tag template” to begin working in another tool, an entire implementation with over 100 rules can be complete and live in Adobe DTM. At scale, Adobe DTM creates time savings that are an order of magnitude above other TMSs.

Does Adobe DTM provide 24/7 Support?

Yes, Search Discovery offers 24/7 support which can be purchased by contacting customer service.

Can I get dedicated account service support?

Yes, a dedicated account manager and consistent point of contact can be purchased by contacting customer service.

Does Adobe DTM work with mobile devices and tablets?

Yes, Mobile / tablet capability - They provide unparalleled mobile web capabilities the UI, out of the box. They support tracking of orientation, location, zooming, swiping/gestures, mobile phone dial from web content, viewable area, and more.

Can Adobe DTM help me clean up and sort my data?

Yes, Adobe DTM can help marry tools and share/create common keys across tags and platforms. Adobe DTM has methods to keep parallel or multi-tool installation sites in-sync. Adobe DTM also has methods for data cleansing and deduplication including visitor/visit/page/event/cookie-based beacon serialization, lowercase data forcing, and more. Beyond that, anything that can be done in client-side javascript to further customize, cleanse, or sort can be done right in Adobe DTM, and the account services, tool experts, and technologists resources will be available to assist on your account.

Can you describe their release management process?

Adobe DTM is software as a service. As they provide updates to the service (both the admin tool and the client-side engine), these upgrades will become immediately available to the clients. Because of how the system works, as they release updates, these will not go live on a client’s site until that client accepts the upgrade and publishes live. This is to ensure that clients can “opt in” to the engine updates; they do not ever publish a change that will lead to untested, unexpected changes on a client site.

Does Adobe DTM support Universal Deployment?

Yes

Does Adobe DTM support HTML5?

Absolutely!

From where can Adobe DTM gather data?

Adobe DTM can gather any data from a page (or a server) and dynamically inject that data into tags in a friendly variable substitution format. For example, passing an orderID into an analytics tool is as simple as inputting “%orderID%” into the appropriate field in the UI. Likewise, revenue, cart items, or any attribute of the DOM can be passed into any tool or tag.

What are the benefits of self-hosting Adobe DTM?

Adobe DTM uniquely allows you to self-host the client-side script, meaning that Adobe DTM is hosted on the same site your web site is. This eliminates DNS lookups, reduces latency to practically zero (the browser already knows the connection), improves download speed, and guarantees uptime (when your site is up, Adobe DTM is up). This feature means you don’t have to trust or vet a third-party server or hosting provider, as you are using your own servers.

What are the benefits to loading tags in parallel?

Adobe DTM allows tags to load in parallel to each other, rather than sequentially. Adobe DTM also allows tags to be loaded after the page is loaded, completely removing them from the scope of page load.

How does Adobe DTM handle Multi-tier development practices?

Consideration for multiple environments is built directly into Adobe DTM. When configuring your web property, Adobe DTM will ask you for accounts for your development/staging and production environments, so your analytics tools will automatically populate the correct profiles. As you work with Adobe DTM’s rule system, rules automatically deploy to your staging/development environment for immediate testing. After rules have been tested and marked as approved in the system, those rules can be deployed to the production site via the UI, only by an admin. And as those deployed rules evolve and change over time, the same process continues: modifications are available for testing, approvals show a full diff since last approval/publish, rule history and rollbacks are updated, and new publishes can be completed.

Adobe DTM has a number of built-in debugging and logging tools built-in, allowing for easier and more precise rule testing. Also, staging libraries can be loaded on the production site local to a browser, if someone would like to simulate tests on the live site before approving or publishing a rule.

Adobe DTM has an extremely robust and logical workflow for multi-tier development practices, ensuring rules are fully tested and approved (with simple and convenient feedback and collaboration features) before they go live.

What does Adobe DTM’s workflow look like?

Adobe DTM has a very logical and powerful workflow for creating, editing, removing, and deploying rules.

When rules are created, edited, or deleted, those changes are reflected immediately in your staging/development environment. This allows rule creators or editors to immediately test their rules and refine as needed.

Once a rule has been edited, it moves into an approval queue. All rules must be approved before they can be published. Approvers must sign off on a rule, stating the rule works as intended, and they can collaborate with rule creators or editors. If an approver does not like a rule, they can reject it and add notes. The rejection can either keep current state or can be rolled back to the previous approved state. The state and notes will be emailed to the last user to edit the rule, offering them feedback on how to get the rule to a state where it can be approved.

Once a rule is approved, it moves into the queue for the next publish. Only rules that have been approved can be published, and only admins are able to publish. On the publish page, a full history of publishes can be seen, where an admin can easily restore prior publishes or rules, when needed.

Are there different user access levels for Adobe DTM?

Yes.

User TypeCreate RulesEdit RulesTest RulesApprove RulesPublish RulesCreate RulesCreate PropertyUse ROVER
UserYesYesYesYesYes
ApproverYesYesYesYesYes
AdministratorYesYesYesYesYesYesYesYes
ROVER UserYesYes

How do I install Adobe DTM?

Installing Adobe DTM on your site with the synchronous installation is done through the inclusion of two snippets of JavaScript. These two snippets are the same for every page of the site, and thusly can be included globally.

In the universal header, a script include (<script src=...) will load Adobe DTM. The position of this script tag in the header is not critical, however we recommend placing this above other scripts that may delay page load, before the </head> tag.

In the universal footer, you will include another snippet:
<script type="text/javascript">_satellite.pageBottom();</script>

This should be placed immediately before the </body> tag, allowing to trigger script or write HTML into the page just in time.

The dual snippets allow users to precisely time rules for page load, enabling scripts, tools, and tags to be triggered at page top, page bottom, DOM ready, onload, or upon user interaction (or any other time of your choosing).

Where can I place tags in my page?

Adobe DTM gives you infinite possibilities to optimize the placement of your tags. The dual snippets allow users to precisely time rules for page load, enabling scripts, tools, and tags to be triggered at page top, page bottom, DOM ready, onload, or upon user interaction (or any other time of your choosing).

Can Adobe DTM be used to deploy unique action tags like Atlas, DFA, javascript and iFrame tagging?

Yes. Tags can be loaded either into the page or in an iframe to isolate from page (improves performance), and Adobe DTM can also dynamically inject data into tags.

What events can Adobe DTM track?

Adobe DTM can track/tag any on-page element and any type of event/interaction (click, mouseover, key press, hover, blur, submit, play, pause, load, unload, change, select, etc.)

Can Adobe DTM help me segment cookies to different partners to test things like remarketing partners?

Yes, the split/segmentation can be done across multiple conditions like traffic source, time of day, random, browser, events taking place, landing page, logged in/registered state, or any combination thereof, and can be set to persist with the user/session or try multiple remarketing partners for the same user within or across their sessions.

Can I see who made changes to my rules and tags?

All rule changes and other activities in the interface are tied to specific users and user history is simple to view for rule edits, configuration changes, or publishes.

What happens if two people are working on the same rule at the same time?

People can work on the same rule at the same time. Conflicts will be resolved in the change history.

Can I test new rules (unapproved rules) on the live site?

Yes, via ROVER, the Adobe DTM bookmarklet, users, approvers, and admins can test staging rules on the live site, can visualize all rules live on the site via an overlay, and can make rule suggestions from the live site in their browser. ROVER also enables detailed debugging information to be printed to the console and also enables users to hide their activity from the analytics tools and tags managed by Adobe DTM.

What’s the difference between the Asynchronous and Synchronous installation of Adobe DTM?

Async installation: page load rules execute immediately when Adobe DTM is loaded into the browser. These rules evaluate the current URL in the browser, trigger all rules relevant to that URL, evaluate all conditions on those rules (checking for login status, reading cookies, page views, etc.), and then if the condition evaluates true, immediately triggers all tool commands like SiteCatalyst and any custom data for that page view and all scripts/third-party tags you have added to the rules.

Synchronous Installation: within the Adobe DTM interface, you will specify when each page load rule should trigger: page top, page bottom, DOM ready, or onload. This setting is when each rule will actually trigger and when that rule's conditions will be evaluated. Different rules for the same pages can be timed differently: it's your choice. All tool commands in these rules will be cached until the tool itself loads. For example, if you load SiteCatalyst at page bottom and have a rule with SiteCatalyst data at page top, the SiteCatalyst data Adobe DTM sees at page top will be saved until SiteCatalyst loads at page bottom. This is done to save you from having to create several rules and remember timing on everything.

Where should I load the SiteCatalyst Page code?

We recommend loading the page code at page bottom. Because of SiteCatalyst's size, you can run into accuracy issues when loading page code after page bottom. SC is not designed well to break this convention, although it is possible.

How does Adobe DTM install SiteCatalyst event tracking?

For event tracking / setting vars / using additional calls to s.t(); and s.tl(); they use event-based rules. Event based rules handle both user interaction and changes in the DOM itself. They can automatically detect elements entering into the DOM and either react to their appearance (a Adobe DTM event called "element exists"), or to a user's interaction with this new element.

How does Adobe DTM with AJAX?

Event based rules handle both user interaction and changes in the DOM itself. They can automatically detect elements entering into the DOM and either react to their appearance (a Adobe DTM event called "element exists"), or to a user's interaction with this new element. Adobe DTM monitors all events in the browser and is great with AJAX, especially with "live" form confirmations, carts, etc.

Flash-tracking sounds equally laborious with Adobe DTM as without?

Unfortunately, Flash tracking is laborious, yes. But the big difference comes if you ever change something later. Without Adobe DTM, that means re-opening the AS3, saving a new swf, and re-deploying the file on the site. With Adobe DTM, if you'd like to add/remove/change tracking to existing Flash elements, it's something you can do in a matter of seconds.

What policies are in place to ensure privacy concerns with Adobe DTM?

The three different types of user roles account for a lot of these concerns, because only certain people in the organization can publish changes to the site. A good password policy is important, too, to prevent people from logging into accounts they don't own. This makes it physically impossible for someone on the outside to log in to their system and see their rules. Also, keep in mind that Adobe DTM does not store any data of any kind, other than rules.

Can Adobe DTM hide my activity?

Yes, in the settings you can turn this activity hiding on, which is kind of like IP exclusion that you see today in your tools except it will apply to everything that Adobe DTM manages. You’ll be able to simulate all the tracking behavior that your tools have but none of that data actually gets sent if you’re an internal employee and you don’t want to write any sort of data into your analytics tool.

How does Adobe DTM handle FTP error handling?

With FTP, they have a background Chron that does validation on the file. So, they actually write a new file, validate the file, and then they overwrite after that file is on the server. So, hypothetically there’s no real downtime unless the overwrite ends up being some sort of a problem. But, the server should have very immediate feedback on that process.

What is ROVER

Rover is a rule visualization technology that works in combination with Adobe DTM.

What is the file size of Adobe DTM

The Adobe DTM file size is usually between 15 - 35k, depending on the rules set up. To give you an example, a large enterprise customer delivers approximately 2,000 third-party tags, about 10,000 unique permutations of Google event and CV tracking, all done through about 400 rules and their file size is under 33K. The file gets cached on the first page view for the duration of the session, so there is only one download per session (this can be customized). Adobe DTM is incredibly small and efficient, to put it lightly! Just to get a feel for this size, it's probably similar in size to a small image on your client's home page -- something they don't think twice about. And since the Adobe DTM file will be self-hosted, performance is a total non-factor, and will likely be a net improvement.

Do you have Client Caching Capabilities?

Yes, caching headers are recommended at the session level. This can be changed at any time.

What happens if a client is using a CDN like Akamai?

If the client uses a CDN like Akamai, Adobe DTM will be edge cached and served just like any other file. Because Adobe DTM's library may be updated more frequently than the site, we recommend setting up a smaller caching interval or linking the cache bust to a ping service they have inside Adobe DTM. Every time the library is published, they can ping both your servers and Akamai to notify of a new file for pickup and caching.

Want an Adobe DTM Demo?

If you want to see the best tag management system on the planet in action, just fill out this request form.

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